Study

While many faculty are beginning to experiment with a flipped approach to the classroom, we have a unique opportunity to assess any difference in outcomes.  A number of faculty members are working together to create a study of flipped classrooms.  The protocols we are using are listed below.

Study Protocols

Dr. Matthew A Verleger from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University has written a paper with Jacob Lowell Bishop of Utah State University reviewing the research on flipped classrooms.  Dr. Verleger provided most of the protocols below.  Dr. Drew Ferrier from Hood College suggested the B Enhanced Protocol.  If anyone has any additional ideas for protocols, please inform the Director.

Protocol A – Grade Analysis
Faculty members share the grades with the names removed with the study from a class before and after it is flipped.  An effort is made to make sure these two classes have similar sizes.

Protocol A Enhanced  — Evaluation Analysis
In this protocol faculty members will also share their faculty evaluations from a class they flipped and from a class before they flipped it.

Protocol B – Question by Question Analysis
Faculty members will create assessments that are the same in a flipped class and in a class that is not flipped.  They will analyze the differences in the answers between these two tests.

Protocol B Enhanced – Pre and Post Question by Question Analysis (Ferrier Protocol)
Faculty members will create pre and post assessments that are the same in a flipped class and in a class that is not flipped.  They will analyze the differences in the answers between these tests.

Protocol C – Extended Analysis
In this protocol faculty members will follow the protocol A or A Enhanced for three years.  This will enable us to document the learning curve when faculty members begin to teach flipped courses.  Right now studies compare faculty members teaching a traditional class that they have taught for years with a flipped class they are teaching for the first time.  It is assumed that we are comparing apples with apples.  This protocol could demonstrate otherwise.  We have plenty of anecdotal information suggesting there is a steep learning curve in the first few years that faculty members teach a flipped course.

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